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TELENOVELAS DE LOS 80\'S.

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Caballo Viejo

Tambien fue una telenovela de los años 80 y fue un exito en la televison colombiana

Author: FaridJR2006
Keywords: Caballo Viejo telenovela 80s caracol television colombia
Added: September 8, 2007

RBD: "Ser o Parecer"

There may be little that is musically authentic about RBD, a prefabricated pop/rock act that was initiated on television, yet the group of Mexican teens achieved astounding commercial success, quickly becoming a multilingual pop culture juggernaut whose market impact stretched from Brazil to the United States. The group is comprised of six youths, three of them boys, three girls -- Alfonso Herrera, Christian Chávez, Dulce María, Maite Perroni, Christopher Uckermann, and Anahí Portilla -- all of them telegenic, able actors, and physically fit to perfection, each with a uniquely fashionable look. They're like a supergroup comprised of both Spice Girls and Backstreet Boys -- manufactured for optimal appeal, no doubt, and forcefully marketed across a range of entertainment mediums, television above all. In fact, music came second for the group, who began as the cast of a prime-time telenovela, Rebelde. The show proved so popular throughout Latin America that the extension of the brand into pop music seemed natural (if not prearranged), for this is a common practice in Hispanic media, as numerous Latin pop stars -- from Thalía and Shakira to Carlos Vives and Chayanne -- got their starts in telenovelas. RBD doesn't write their own songs or play any of the music; they sing, act, dance, and give the music a marketable face. Moreover, there's little that's "Latin" about the group in terms of music. They may be Mexican and sing primarily in Spanish, but their music is tried-and-true pop/rock, modeled primarily after arena rock and power ballads of the '80s. Critics, of course, loathed RBD, often mocking the notion that there was anything "rebellious" about the act. Still, that didn't stop RBD from garnering legions of young fans across the world and selling tons of CDs and DVDs in the process. The group RBD debuted in 2004 with the album Rebelde, which was released by EMI and opens with the show's theme song of the same name. The primary writers for the project were DJ Kafka, Max di Carlo, and Armando Ávila, and their songs proved nearly as popular as the show. The first three singles ("Rebelde," "Solo Quedate en Silencio," "Sálvame") were all number one hits in Mexico, with the fourth single, "Un Poco de Tu Amor," reaching number two. A Portuguese-language edition of the album was released for the Brazilian market in 2005. And though no English-language edition was released, Rebelde sold well in the States (released there in 2005), breaking into the Top 100 of the album chart and reaching number two on the Top Latin Albums chart. The releases continued with little pause. In July came a live CD/DVD, Tour Generación RBD en Vivo, commemorating the group's sold-out tour of Mexico (35 sold-out concerts across the country, including six in Mexico City alone). And in October came their second studio album, Nuestro Amor, which set new sales records in Mexico, selling 160,000 copies in its first week alone. In the U.S., the album topped the Latin Albums chart and again broke into the overall Top 100. The first four singles all were number one hits in Mexico: "Nuestro Amor," "Aún Hay Algo," "Tras de Mi," and "Este Corazón." These singles were hits in the U.S., but didn't do any chart-topping. The following year (i.e., 2006) brought no rest for RBD. Tragedy struck early, when a 38-year-old woman and her children, ages 11 and 13, were trampled during an autograph rush in the parking lot of a shopping mall in São Paulo on February 4. The three died and another 42 were injured in the incident, which involved the breach of a security fence holding back an estimated 15,000 rabid fans. Not long after, RBD toured the United States for the first time, in April issuing a commemorative CD/DVD, Live in Hollywood. Several months later, Rebelde the telenovela came to an end with the finale of its third season on June 2. With the finale came promising news for fans, however, as the group announced that they would begin filming a movie and recording an English-language album comprised of songs from their first two albums. (Earlier in 2006 they had released a Portuguese version of Nuestro Amor, titled Nosso Amor.) Plus, the group announced that they would continue to tour and would begin working on their third Spanish-language album. EMI released the two albums -- Celestial (Spanish) and Rebels (English) -- shortly before Christmas; the former sold very well, led by the number one single "Ser o Parecer," while the latter was greeted with comparatively minor success, led by the single "Tu Amor," which was a popular video on MTV Tr3s.

Author: ArioTv
Keywords: RBD Group pop rock latin music Rebelde spanish mexicans
Added: September 16, 2007

RBD: "Nuestro Amor"

There may be little that is musically authentic about RBD, a prefabricated pop/rock act that was initiated on television, yet the group of Mexican teens achieved astounding commercial success, quickly becoming a multilingual pop culture juggernaut whose market impact stretched from Brazil to the United States. The group is comprised of six youths, three of them boys, three girls -- Alfonso Herrera, Christian Chávez, Dulce María, Maite Perroni, Christopher Uckermann, and Anahí Portilla -- all of them telegenic, able actors, and physically fit to perfection, each with a uniquely fashionable look. They're like a supergroup comprised of both Spice Girls and Backstreet Boys -- manufactured for optimal appeal, no doubt, and forcefully marketed across a range of entertainment mediums, television above all. In fact, music came second for the group, who began as the cast of a prime-time telenovela, Rebelde. The show proved so popular throughout Latin America that the extension of the brand into pop music seemed natural (if not prearranged), for this is a common practice in Hispanic media, as numerous Latin pop stars -- from Thalía and Shakira to Carlos Vives and Chayanne -- got their starts in telenovelas. RBD doesn't write their own songs or play any of the music; they sing, act, dance, and give the music a marketable face. Moreover, there's little that's "Latin" about the group in terms of music. They may be Mexican and sing primarily in Spanish, but their music is tried-and-true pop/rock, modeled primarily after arena rock and power ballads of the '80s. Critics, of course, loathed RBD, often mocking the notion that there was anything "rebellious" about the act. Still, that didn't stop RBD from garnering legions of young fans across the world and selling tons of CDs and DVDs in the process. The group RBD debuted in 2004 with the album Rebelde, which was released by EMI and opens with the show's theme song of the same name. The primary writers for the project were DJ Kafka, Max di Carlo, and Armando Ávila, and their songs proved nearly as popular as the show. The first three singles ("Rebelde," "Solo Quedate en Silencio," "Sálvame") were all number one hits in Mexico, with the fourth single, "Un Poco de Tu Amor," reaching number two. A Portuguese-language edition of the album was released for the Brazilian market in 2005. And though no English-language edition was released, Rebelde sold well in the States (released there in 2005), breaking into the Top 100 of the album chart and reaching number two on the Top Latin Albums chart. The releases continued with little pause. In July came a live CD/DVD, Tour Generación RBD en Vivo, commemorating the group's sold-out tour of Mexico (35 sold-out concerts across the country, including six in Mexico City alone). And in October came their second studio album, Nuestro Amor, which set new sales records in Mexico, selling 160,000 copies in its first week alone. In the U.S., the album topped the Latin Albums chart and again broke into the overall Top 100. The first four singles all were number one hits in Mexico: "Nuestro Amor," "Aún Hay Algo," "Tras de Mi," and "Este Corazón." These singles were hits in the U.S., but didn't do any chart-topping. The following year (i.e., 2006) brought no rest for RBD. Tragedy struck early, when a 38-year-old woman and her children, ages 11 and 13, were trampled during an autograph rush in the parking lot of a shopping mall in São Paulo on February 4. The three died and another 42 were injured in the incident, which involved the breach of a security fence holding back an estimated 15,000 rabid fans. Not long after, RBD toured the United States for the first time, in April issuing a commemorative CD/DVD, Live in Hollywood. Several months later, Rebelde the telenovela came to an end with the finale of its third season on June 2. With the finale came promising news for fans, however, as the group announced that they would begin filming a movie and recording an English-language album comprised of songs from their first two albums. (Earlier in 2006 they had released a Portuguese version of Nuestro Amor, titled Nosso Amor.) Plus, the group announced that they would continue to tour and would begin working on their third Spanish-language album. EMI released the two albums -- Celestial (Spanish) and Rebels (English) -- shortly before Christmas; the former sold very well, led by the number one single "Ser o Parecer," while the latter was greeted with comparatively minor success, led by the single "Tu Amor," which was a popular video on MTV Tr3s.

Author: ArioTv
Keywords: RBD Group Rebelde pop rock latin music spanish mexicans
Added: September 17, 2007

RBD: "Este Corazón"

There may be little that is musically authentic about RBD, a prefabricated pop/rock act that was initiated on television, yet the group of Mexican teens achieved astounding commercial success, quickly becoming a multilingual pop culture juggernaut whose market impact stretched from Brazil to the United States. The group is comprised of six youths, three of them boys, three girls -- Alfonso Herrera, Christian Chávez, Dulce María, Maite Perroni, Christopher Uckermann, and Anahí Portilla -- all of them telegenic, able actors, and physically fit to perfection, each with a uniquely fashionable look. They're like a supergroup comprised of both Spice Girls and Backstreet Boys -- manufactured for optimal appeal, no doubt, and forcefully marketed across a range of entertainment mediums, television above all. In fact, music came second for the group, who began as the cast of a prime-time telenovela, Rebelde. The show proved so popular throughout Latin America that the extension of the brand into pop music seemed natural (if not prearranged), for this is a common practice in Hispanic media, as numerous Latin pop stars -- from Thalía and Shakira to Carlos Vives and Chayanne -- got their starts in telenovelas. RBD doesn't write their own songs or play any of the music; they sing, act, dance, and give the music a marketable face. Moreover, there's little that's "Latin" about the group in terms of music. They may be Mexican and sing primarily in Spanish, but their music is tried-and-true pop/rock, modeled primarily after arena rock and power ballads of the '80s. Critics, of course, loathed RBD, often mocking the notion that there was anything "rebellious" about the act. Still, that didn't stop RBD from garnering legions of young fans across the world and selling tons of CDs and DVDs in the process. The group RBD debuted in 2004 with the album Rebelde, which was released by EMI and opens with the show's theme song of the same name. The primary writers for the project were DJ Kafka, Max di Carlo, and Armando Ávila, and their songs proved nearly as popular as the show. The first three singles ("Rebelde," "Solo Quedate en Silencio," "Sálvame") were all number one hits in Mexico, with the fourth single, "Un Poco de Tu Amor," reaching number two. A Portuguese-language edition of the album was released for the Brazilian market in 2005. And though no English-language edition was released, Rebelde sold well in the States (released there in 2005), breaking into the Top 100 of the album chart and reaching number two on the Top Latin Albums chart. The releases continued with little pause. In July came a live CD/DVD, Tour Generación RBD en Vivo, commemorating the group's sold-out tour of Mexico (35 sold-out concerts across the country, including six in Mexico City alone). And in October came their second studio album, Nuestro Amor, which set new sales records in Mexico, selling 160,000 copies in its first week alone. In the U.S., the album topped the Latin Albums chart and again broke into the overall Top 100. The first four singles all were number one hits in Mexico: "Nuestro Amor," "Aún Hay Algo," "Tras de Mi," and "Este Corazón." These singles were hits in the U.S., but didn't do any chart-topping. The following year (i.e., 2006) brought no rest for RBD. Tragedy struck early, when a 38-year-old woman and her children, ages 11 and 13, were trampled during an autograph rush in the parking lot of a shopping mall in São Paulo on February 4. The three died and another 42 were injured in the incident, which involved the breach of a security fence holding back an estimated 15,000 rabid fans. Not long after, RBD toured the United States for the first time, in April issuing a commemorative CD/DVD, Live in Hollywood. Several months later, Rebelde the telenovela came to an end with the finale of its third season on June 2. With the finale came promising news for fans, however, as the group announced that they would begin filming a movie and recording an English-language album comprised of songs from their first two albums. (Earlier in 2006 they had released a Portuguese version of Nuestro Amor, titled Nosso Amor.) Plus, the group announced that they would continue to tour and would begin working on their third Spanish-language album. EMI released the two albums -- Celestial (Spanish) and Rebels (English) -- shortly before Christmas; the former sold very well, led by the number one single "Ser o Parecer," while the latter was greeted with comparatively minor success, led by the single "Tu Amor," which was a popular video on MTV Tr3s.

Author: ArioTv
Keywords: RBD Group Rebelde pop rock latin music spanish mexicans
Added: September 17, 2007

RBD: "Bésame Sin Miedo"

There may be little that is musically authentic about RBD, a prefabricated pop/rock act that was initiated on television, yet the group of Mexican teens achieved astounding commercial success, quickly becoming a multilingual pop culture juggernaut whose market impact stretched from Brazil to the United States. The group is comprised of six youths, three of them boys, three girls -- Alfonso Herrera, Christian Chávez, Dulce María, Maite Perroni, Christopher Uckermann, and Anahí Portilla -- all of them telegenic, able actors, and physically fit to perfection, each with a uniquely fashionable look. They're like a supergroup comprised of both Spice Girls and Backstreet Boys -- manufactured for optimal appeal, no doubt, and forcefully marketed across a range of entertainment mediums, television above all. In fact, music came second for the group, who began as the cast of a prime-time telenovela, Rebelde. The show proved so popular throughout Latin America that the extension of the brand into pop music seemed natural (if not prearranged), for this is a common practice in Hispanic media, as numerous Latin pop stars -- from Thalía and Shakira to Carlos Vives and Chayanne -- got their starts in telenovelas. RBD doesn't write their own songs or play any of the music; they sing, act, dance, and give the music a marketable face. Moreover, there's little that's "Latin" about the group in terms of music. They may be Mexican and sing primarily in Spanish, but their music is tried-and-true pop/rock, modeled primarily after arena rock and power ballads of the '80s. Critics, of course, loathed RBD, often mocking the notion that there was anything "rebellious" about the act. Still, that didn't stop RBD from garnering legions of young fans across the world and selling tons of CDs and DVDs in the process. The group RBD debuted in 2004 with the album Rebelde, which was released by EMI and opens with the show's theme song of the same name. The primary writers for the project were DJ Kafka, Max di Carlo, and Armando Ávila, and their songs proved nearly as popular as the show. The first three singles ("Rebelde," "Solo Quedate en Silencio," "Sálvame") were all number one hits in Mexico, with the fourth single, "Un Poco de Tu Amor," reaching number two. A Portuguese-language edition of the album was released for the Brazilian market in 2005. And though no English-language edition was released, Rebelde sold well in the States (released there in 2005), breaking into the Top 100 of the album chart and reaching number two on the Top Latin Albums chart. The releases continued with little pause. In July came a live CD/DVD, Tour Generación RBD en Vivo, commemorating the group's sold-out tour of Mexico (35 sold-out concerts across the country, including six in Mexico City alone). And in October came their second studio album, Nuestro Amor, which set new sales records in Mexico, selling 160,000 copies in its first week alone. In the U.S., the album topped the Latin Albums chart and again broke into the overall Top 100. The first four singles all were number one hits in Mexico: "Nuestro Amor," "Aún Hay Algo," "Tras de Mi," and "Este Corazón." These singles were hits in the U.S., but didn't do any chart-topping. The following year (i.e., 2006) brought no rest for RBD. Tragedy struck early, when a 38-year-old woman and her children, ages 11 and 13, were trampled during an autograph rush in the parking lot of a shopping mall in São Paulo on February 4. The three died and another 42 were injured in the incident, which involved the breach of a security fence holding back an estimated 15,000 rabid fans. Not long after, RBD toured the United States for the first time, in April issuing a commemorative CD/DVD, Live in Hollywood. Several months later, Rebelde the telenovela came to an end with the finale of its third season on June 2. With the finale came promising news for fans, however, as the group announced that they would begin filming a movie and recording an English-language album comprised of songs from their first two albums. (Earlier in 2006 they had released a Portuguese version of Nuestro Amor, titled Nosso Amor.) Plus, the group announced that they would continue to tour and would begin working on their third Spanish-language album. EMI released the two albums -- Celestial (Spanish) and Rebels (English) -- shortly before Christmas; the former sold very well, led by the number one single "Ser o Parecer," while the latter was greeted with comparatively minor success, led by the single "Tu Amor," which was a popular video on MTV Tr3s.

Author: ArioTv
Keywords: RBD Group Rebelde amor romantico pop rock latin music spanish mexicans
Added: September 17, 2007

RBD: "Sólo Quédate En Silencio"

There may be little that is musically authentic about RBD, a prefabricated pop/rock act that was initiated on television, yet the group of Mexican teens achieved astounding commercial success, quickly becoming a multilingual pop culture juggernaut whose market impact stretched from Brazil to the United States. The group is comprised of six youths, three of them boys, three girls -- Alfonso Herrera, Christian Chávez, Dulce María, Maite Perroni, Christopher Uckermann, and Anahí Portilla -- all of them telegenic, able actors, and physically fit to perfection, each with a uniquely fashionable look. They're like a supergroup comprised of both Spice Girls and Backstreet Boys -- manufactured for optimal appeal, no doubt, and forcefully marketed across a range of entertainment mediums, television above all. In fact, music came second for the group, who began as the cast of a prime-time telenovela, Rebelde. The show proved so popular throughout Latin America that the extension of the brand into pop music seemed natural (if not prearranged), for this is a common practice in Hispanic media, as numerous Latin pop stars -- from Thalía and Shakira to Carlos Vives and Chayanne -- got their starts in telenovelas. RBD doesn't write their own songs or play any of the music; they sing, act, dance, and give the music a marketable face. Moreover, there's little that's "Latin" about the group in terms of music. They may be Mexican and sing primarily in Spanish, but their music is tried-and-true pop/rock, modeled primarily after arena rock and power ballads of the '80s. Critics, of course, loathed RBD, often mocking the notion that there was anything "rebellious" about the act. Still, that didn't stop RBD from garnering legions of young fans across the world and selling tons of CDs and DVDs in the process. The group RBD debuted in 2004 with the album Rebelde, which was released by EMI and opens with the show's theme song of the same name. The primary writers for the project were DJ Kafka, Max di Carlo, and Armando Ávila, and their songs proved nearly as popular as the show. The first three singles ("Rebelde," "Solo Quedate en Silencio," "Sálvame") were all number one hits in Mexico, with the fourth single, "Un Poco de Tu Amor," reaching number two. A Portuguese-language edition of the album was released for the Brazilian market in 2005. And though no English-language edition was released, Rebelde sold well in the States (released there in 2005), breaking into the Top 100 of the album chart and reaching number two on the Top Latin Albums chart. The releases continued with little pause. In July came a live CD/DVD, Tour Generación RBD en Vivo, commemorating the group's sold-out tour of Mexico (35 sold-out concerts across the country, including six in Mexico City alone). And in October came their second studio album, Nuestro Amor, which set new sales records in Mexico, selling 160,000 copies in its first week alone. In the U.S., the album topped the Latin Albums chart and again broke into the overall Top 100. The first four singles all were number one hits in Mexico: "Nuestro Amor," "Aún Hay Algo," "Tras de Mi," and "Este Corazón." These singles were hits in the U.S., but didn't do any chart-topping. The following year (i.e., 2006) brought no rest for RBD. Tragedy struck early, when a 38-year-old woman and her children, ages 11 and 13, were trampled during an autograph rush in the parking lot of a shopping mall in São Paulo on February 4. The three died and another 42 were injured in the incident, which involved the breach of a security fence holding back an estimated 15,000 rabid fans. Not long after, RBD toured the United States for the first time, in April issuing a commemorative CD/DVD, Live in Hollywood. Several months later, Rebelde the telenovela came to an end with the finale of its third season on June 2. With the finale came promising news for fans, however, as the group announced that they would begin filming a movie and recording an English-language album comprised of songs from their first two albums. (Earlier in 2006 they had released a Portuguese version of Nuestro Amor, titled Nosso Amor.) Plus, the group announced that they would continue to tour and would begin working on their third Spanish-language album. EMI released the two albums -- Celestial (Spanish) and Rebels (English) -- shortly before Christmas; the former sold very well, led by the number one single "Ser o Parecer," while the latter was greeted with comparatively minor success, led by the single "Tu Amor," which was a popular video on MTV Tr3s.

Author: ArioTv
Keywords: RBD Group Rebelde pop rock latin music spanish mexicans amor romantico
Added: September 26, 2007

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[ UK ] THE GUARDIAN: Analiza las telenovelas
Este formato clásico ha servido a millones de televidentes desde los años 80, requiriendo poca variación. Pero hay una nueva generación de productores que parecen estar rompiendo todas estas reglas y el resultado es muy entretenido. ...

Algunas reflexiones sobre las telenovelas de Telemundo...
Los '60 fueron de las telenovelas argentinas. Los'70 fueron de las telenovelas mexicanas. Los '80 fueron de las telenovelas venezolanas. Los '90 fueron de las telenovelas colombianas. Esto lo he leido y oido en varias partes y gustele a ...

BIOGRAFIA - VERONICA CASTRO FAMOSA ACTRIZ MEXICANA UNA DE LA MÁS ...
CONSAGRANDOSE MAS TARDE CON "ROSA SALVAJE" EN LOS AÑOS 80', HIZO TELENOVELAS EN ARGENTINA "VERONICA EL ROSTRO DEL AMOR" EN EL AÑO 1982. Y TAMBIÈN EN ITALIA, ADEMÀS DE ACTRIZ ES CANTANTE, ANIMADORA DE TV. SE ACUERDAN DE ESE VARIADO ...

Telenovelas colombianas 70s y 80s (reel)
Extractos de algunas de las telenovelas mas relevantes durante esas decadas.

Telenovelas colombianas 80s (reel)
Los Pecados de Hines de Hinojosa + Porqué Matarona Betty si era tan buena muchacha + La Otra Mitad del Sol.

Me encanta la televisa de los 80`s
Tan innovadora, tan abierta, de tan buena calidad, definitivamente fue la pionera de las telenovelas en todos los sentidos, CUNA DE LOBOS de sus mejores glorias:cara_risa:

BIOGRAFIA - TELENOVELA , TELESERIE O CULEBRÓN EN ESPAÑA ...
... DE MÉXICO O "ISAURA LA ESCLAVA" DEL BRAZIL SE HA VISTO INTERMINABLES PRODUCCIONES, EL PERÚ ES UN PAÍS QUE TAMBIÉN PRODUCE TELENOVELAS DESDE HACE MUCHOS AÑOS LOS 60', 70'80'90' Y ACTUALIDAD, A MI PERSONALMENTE LA QUE ME GUSTÓ FUE UNA ...

APALABRADO CON JUAN SOLER
... jamás la ví aunque haya rencarnado quién sabe cuántas veces, como casi todas las telenovelas de la empresa, pero parece improbable ya que si bien Juan cumplía 29, don Ernesto andaría en 80s, aunque en Televisa todo es posible. ...

Amores eternos
Desde que 'Cristal' llegara a nuestra pequeña pantalla en la década de los 80, las telenovelas, por increíble que pueda parecer, han evolucionado de forma considerable. Lo han hecho, créanme. En aquellos años sólo existía TVE, ...

Al Diablo con ..¿lo tradicional?
Los titulos de las ultimas telenovelas han dejado mucho que desear y una profunda desilusion en el publico apasionado por el genero. Venezuela, pais que en los 80 y 90 casi domino el genero con sus producciones baratonas llenas de ...

Machinas: Claudia Ramirez, bucha, machota, poco femenina ...
En los 80s y 90s era una actriz muy reconocida. Un poco sosa y gris pero buena actriz. No era de escandalos hasta que se junto con uno de Fobia o Caifanes, sepa cual y quedo embarazada. De ahi se fue en picada su carrera. ...

No-Veas: Delia Fiallo, Rodena, Cabrujas, Gallegos y su importancia ...
Jose Ignacio Cabrujas escribio otras de las populares telenovelas Venezolanas de la epoca de los 80. Se reconocen entre su trabajo La Señora de Cardenas, La Dueña, Señora y La Dama De Rosa. La mas exitosa a nivel mundial fue La Dama De ...

Como las viejas tomaron el poder en las novelas
En los 80's predomino la belleza de las jovenes de nueva cuenta. No había una sola telenovela de viejas que llamara la atención. Angélica María intento ser la joven usurpadora en El Hogar que yo Robé siendo un sendo fracaso en la ...

Los criados de grandes productores de los 80`s son los que producen
las novelas de hoy en dia, por eso las novelas de ahora son una reverenda porqueria:cara_risa::cara_risa:, es como si pusieras a la criada al frente de tu empresa, o sea nada que ver:cara_risa::cara_risa: las novelas de hoy en dia son ...

LAS 100 CHICAS MAS SEXYS DEL AÑO. PRIMERA ENTREGA: PUESTOS DEL 100 ...
BARBARA MORI (76): Actriz uruguaya de telenovelas. 82. TONI BRAXTON (26): Cantante estadounidense de r&b. 81. KATHERINE HEIGHL (E): Actriz estadounidense, "Izzie" en "Anatomia de Grey". 80. KYLIE MINOGUE (62): Cantante australiana. ...

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